What Does -140 in Betting Mean?

If you’re reading this, I assume you’re interested in betting or gambling. Congrats! You’re in the right place. Let’s have some fun. Here’s the scoop on -140 in betting. Keep reading for more info.

Key Facts About -140 In Betting

  • Handicap
  • Odds
  • Over/Under
  • Probability
  • Straight Up / Against The Spread (ATS)
  • Point Spread
  • Total Bet
  • Winnings / Limiting Losses
  • Place Bet / Take Profit
  • Corresponding Handle
  • Expiration Date
  • Payout Percentage
  • Progressive / Fixed Matches

Whether you’re experienced or simply at a new game, knowing the key facts about -140 in betting will make it easy to understand the logic behind the numbers. Knowing these numbers will allow you to make the right wager at the right time. And since we’re talking about betting, let’s make sure you understand the important differences between the various betting options.

The Handicap

The handicap is used to even the odds of two or more teams or players competing in a game or tournament. Simply put, it is a way of making the game more interesting and, thus, more appealing to potential bettors. The name handicap comes from the fact that, traditionally, gamblers would use physical handicaps to beat the odds of nature (or God, if you believe in that sort of thing). For example, if there were two horses in a race with equally untapped potential, the handicapper would likely choose the weaker horse (based on its physical attributes) to make the race more interesting. In addition to making the game more interesting, the handicap also makes it easier for punters to predict the outcome of a game or tournament since there are now fewer strong and weak competitors. In the case of a multiple-team event, such as the Super Bowl or the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, the handicap is simply the sum of the scores of the two teams competing.

The Odds

The odds are the ratio of the likelihood of a certain outcome to the degree of its likelihood. For example, if you bet on a horse race and you feel that the horse you picked has a 20% chance of winning, then the odds are 1:5 or 0.2. The way the odds work is that the house (that is, the casino or bookmaker) takes the risk of the bet, while you, the bettor, enjoy the advantage. When you make a wager on a sporting event that has straight up odds (no spread odds), you’re effectively betting on the result without any kind of handicap. The advantage of using straight up odds is that it makes the game more objective. If you’re using odds that include spreads (such as -140), then that represents a particular interpretation of the results of a particular event. Thus, when you bet on a game with these types of odds, you’re not actually betting on the game itself but rather on how others intend to interpret the game. For example, if you wager on the Super Bowl and it ends up being a blowout, then you lose your bet (since there’s no way you could’ve possibly predicted that). But if you had chosen to bet on the game itself, you would’ve won your bet because he game ended up being very close. In most cases, you’ll hear people say that betting on games with spreads is akin to playing the lottery. While it’s true that you’re never going to be able to truly predict the outcome of a game, in most cases you can get an idea of how the game might play out based on the betting line. Sometimes this can even give you a good idea of how the game truly went. Remember, though, that just because the game ended up going your way doesn’t mean you’ll necessarily win your bet. For example, if you had bet $100 on a game with -140 odds and the score was 70-21 in favor of your team, you would’ve won $140 (you would’ve technically won $100 plus $40 in profit). But if the game had ended up 38-31 in favor of the opposing team, you would’ve lost your $100 plus $31 in loss.

The Over / Under

The over and the under are used to determine the exact score of a game or tournament. For example, if you bet on a Super Bowl game and you feel that the over/under for that game is 42.5 points, then you’re effectively betting that the game will be within that range. You can also use the over/under to find the maximum score for a game or tournament; for example, if the over/under for a basketball game is 75, then the maximum score for that game is 75.

The Probability

The probability of an event refers to the likelihood of that event occurring. For example, the probability of getting a specific score in a game of football is 1 out of 17, which means that there’s a 1 in 17 chance that you’ll get that score. The probability of an event occurring determines the odds of that event occurring. For example, if you bet on a horse race and you feel that the odds of your horse winning are 10:1, then the probability of your horse winning is 0.5 or 50%. The probability of an event happening is sometimes hard to estimate; for example, what is the probability of getting a touchdown in the next NFL (National Football League) game? Although you can get an idea of the likelihood of an event based on statistics (such as the fact that touchdowns occur on about 1 in 4.5 NFL games), in most cases you’ll have to rely on your gut instinct or the opinions of others. In some cases, you might be able to get an idea of the probability based on the track record of a certain team or player. For example, if you’ve watched enough Dallas Cowboys games (the team Michael Jordan played for, the odds are pretty high that you know what will happen next).

The Straight Up / Against The Spread

The straight up and against the spread are used to determine the winner of a game or sports event. Simply put, in a straight up game (no spread), you’re effectively betting on the result of the game without any type of handicap. For example, if you bet $100 on a baseball game and you feel that the odds of the home team winning are 8:1, then you’re effectively betting on that game to be 8:1. As with most things regarding betting, there are exceptions. If you’re using an online betting site, then you’ll typically see the term “against the spread” in relation to football and basketball since these sports use a different scoring system than other sports. For example, in American football, if you bet on the spread, then you’re effectively betting on the score at the end of the game. Not the result of the game itself. The advantage of using the straight up and against the spread is that it makes the game more objective. Since there are no handicaps in traditional sports, this makes them easier to analyze. For example, if you look at baseball statistics, you’ll see that the number of runs a team scores (or concedes) affects the way you would’ve bet (with runs scored, the home team wins 7.5:1; with no runs scored, the home team wins 2.5:1). In most cases, this is all you need to know. In some cases, you might need to know what outfit a player is wearing as well (the Chicago Cubs usually wear black, for example, while the St. Louis Cardinals wear red). In other words, in most cases you’ll simply need to know the outcome of the game (whether the home team wins or loses) and the score (if there’s one). Statistically speaking, against the spread betting doesn’t make much sense and is mostly used by people who like to play the lottery rather than engage in actual gambling (or are just trying to scam you out of your money).