What is the Moneyline?

The Moneyline is the total combined score from the betting lines on all the matches in a single sportsbook. The Moneyline is usually calculated at the end of each day’s action and posted at the top of the page, next to the word CASH. It is a simple way to identify which teams are profitable and which teams are losing. If you are new to sports betting, or just want to familiarize yourself with the term, check out this article.

What Does the Moneyline Mean?

When a sportsbook releases odds for a game, it is the total amount of money you need to risk in order to win $100. For example, if a bookmaker offers 5 Denver Broncos to win, you would need to risk $200 in order to earn $100. The moneyline is a way of measuring the attractiveness of an overall betting option by comparing it to a baseline of $100. For example, if the moneyline for a game is $110, that means you would need to risk $110 to win $100. When a team with a plus moneyline scores, it is generally accepted that they will win the game. Similarly, when a team with a minus moneyline scores, they are considered to have lost the game. The general public perceives moneylines in a similar manner, assuming that teams with a plus moneyline will win and those with a minus moneyline will lose. However, this is not always the case, as explained below.

Why Does The Moneyline Vary By Game?

In baseball, the moneyline is usually displayed as $1. In order to calculate the moneyline for baseball, you would need to multiply the total amount of runs by the total amount of wins. For example, a game with 10 runs and 2 wins would have a moneyline of $20 (10 x 2 = $20). This is because the amount of income you can expect to earn on a $1 wager varies by game. For example, a $1 wager on the New York Mets is worth more than a $1 wager on the Colorado Rockies due to the superior odds of the Mets. The same goes for long shots and small-market teams.

Why Are Some Teams Worth More Than Others?

Sportsbooks will often adjust their lines in order to account for the amount of money they make or lose on a particular game. The teams that are least attractive to bet against are typically the ones that make the most money. This is likely due to an inflated public perception of the likelihood of those teams winning. In fact, there are numerous examples of underdogs proving everyone else wrong and going on to win big games.

Why Are Some Teams More Attractive Than Others?

The opposite is also often true when comparing two teams who have the same winning percentage. Simply put, some teams are more attractive to bet on than others because they have a better overall record. For example, the 2014 Kansas City Royals had a winning percentage of.500, yet they were only 1-4 against the spread last season. However, they had a full 12-4 against the spread in May and June, illustrating that they were very nearly +12 in all their games that month. As a result, they were extremely attractive to bet on in May and June despite having a losing record overall. In general, public perception follows suit and a team with a better winning percentage is often considered more attractive to bet on.

Using Moneylines To Identify Trends

One of the best things about the Moneyline is that it is easy to understand and can be used to identify trending lines and games. Simply examine the current moneyline for each team in a particular sport. If the moneyline is +100 or -100, there is clearly no trend yet. However, if the moneyline is consistently in the positive or negative territory, there is probably a trend developing. In order to identify actual trends, you would have to look at each game individually and not just at the current moneyline for each team. The following are a few relevant examples of popular trends as illustrated by the Moneyline.

Steady Positive Moneylines

A steady positive Moneyline indicates that a team is performing at a level that is consistent and allows for repeated betting success. The 2015 St. Louis Cardinals had a Moneyline of +100 and covered 11 out of 12 games. Similarly, the 2014 Kansas City Royals had a Moneyline of +100 and covered 12 out of 13 games. These teams have been very consistent over the past two seasons and should be very likely to continue to be profitable betting options. As a result, they are always worth a punt on in the Moneyline.

Steady Negative Moneylines

A steady negative Moneyline indicates that a team is performing at a level that is consistent and allows for repeated betting success. The 2015 St. Louis Cardinals had a Moneyline of -100 and covered 12 out of 12 games. Similarly, the 2014 Kansas City Royals had a Moneyline of -100 and covered 12 out of 13 games. These teams have also been very consistent over the past two seasons and should be very likely to continue to be profitable betting options. As a result, they are always worth a punt on in the Moneyline.

Bouncing Back From A Loss

In 2014, the Kansas City Royals had a Moneyline of -100 and covered 6 out of 7 games, before going on to lose 12 of their next 14. The following season, they had a Moneyline of -120 and covered 3 out of 4 games, before losing their final two games of the season. These games were part of a six-game losing streak that was snapped by the Royals in June. As a result of this, the 2014 and 2015 Kansas City Royals are relevant examples of bouncing back from a loss. The fact that they were able to win those two games against tremendous odds shows that they were able to put their loss behind them and continue to be a good betting option on the basis of prior performance alone.

Underdog Victories

Underdogs are typically defined as the teams that are considered to have a disadvantage in terms of experience or resources versus the favored team. Underdogs frequently go on to surprise and shock the world by defeating the favorites. One of the most famous underdogs of all time is the 1955 New York Yankees, who came from way down at number nine in the standings to crush their opponents, the Brooklyn Dodgers, in the World Series. Underdogs frequently have an advantage in terms of motivation, as they are driven by the desire to prove everyone wrong, including their own fans and management. One of the best examples of an underdog victory came in the 2002 World Series, when the underdog St. Louis Cardinals breezed through what had been a very closely contested and hotly contested rivalry, defeating the previously favored Arizona Diamondbacks, 4-2. As a result of this, the underdogs have had an advantage in the past and even now, they remain a popular betting option if one is looking for an underdog victory. In general, underdogs are considered to be safer and more reliable than most other team options, particularly against the spread.

Using The Over/Under To Identify Trends

The Over/Under is the total amount of points that will be scored in a particular game. For example, if the over/under for a football game is 33, that means there will be either 4 or 5 points scored in the game. The following are some examples of the Over/Under being used to identify trends:

Higher Over/Ungets

In the 2013 season, the New York Yankees had an over/under of 6.2 wins and the Toronto Blue Jays had an over/under of 5.5 wins. In general, teams that are able to score more points than their opponents are very likely to win the game. Because the number of points that will be scored is typically higher for football than other sports, teams that are able to score a lot of points are very likely to go on to win. As a result, the 2013 New York Yankees and the 2014 Toronto Blue Jays are two relevant examples of higher over/under games. These games are generally very high scoring affairs and are worth a punt in the Over/Under if one is looking to obtain positive returns.

Lower Over/Ungets

On the other side of the spectrum, the 2014 Oakland A’s had an over/under of 4.2 wins and the Baltimore Orioles had an over/under of 3.7 wins. In general, teams that are able to score fewer points than their opponents are very likely to win the game. As a result, the 2014 Oakland A’s and the 2014 Baltimore Orioles are two relevant examples of lower over/under games. These games are generally low scoring affairs and are worth a punt in the Over/Under if one is looking to obtain negative returns.