What Does the ‘+’ and ‘-‘ Mean in Boxing Betting?

Boxing (also known as pugilism or paddy fighting) is one of the most popular sports in the world. And, as with most sports, there’s a lot more than one way to bet on it. Specifically, there are three different odds makers that you might want to consider: the British, the American and the Japanese. Let’s take a quick look at what these odds mean and whether or not you should care about them.

The Japanese Odds

If you’ve ever played the Japanese version of Football (soccer), you’re probably familiar with the idea of betting on the ‘over’ or ‘under’ as the case may be. For example, if you believe that the team you’re watching is going to win the game, you might want to bet on them to cover the spread. The same goes for boxing, but with a few key differences. First, you don’t need to know anything about football to understand what the ‘over’ or ‘under’ refers to in boxing betting. Simply put, if the spread is set at three goals and the chosen fighter scores more than three, the bet is considered ‘over’. If the spread is set at three goals and the chosen fighter scores fewer than three, the bet is considered ‘under’.

The second difference between football and boxing betting is that in the latter, you’re not just betting on the result of the fight. You’re also wagering on the style of the fight – does it go the distance (four rounds or more) or will it be an exciting slugfest (one or two rounds)?

The British Odds

Most people are probably more familiar with the British betting system, as it was exported around the world and is used extensively around the globe. In fact, the two systems are so similar that many bettors refer to the British odds as the ‘A.I.’ – ‘As If It Were.’ This is because the A.I. stands for ‘Annual Inflation,’ a practice that was started in the ‘70s and still continues to this day. But, in general, the British odds are much more complicated than the Japanese odds. This is because the British odds maker, Ladbrokes, has to consider a number of variables to come up with an accurate estimate of the outcome of a boxing match. Some examples of what they consider include who’s the more experienced boxer, who’s the taller fighter, who has the better chin and so on. Basically, all the things that you’d need to know if you were comparing the two fighters head-to-head. And, to make matters worse, the British odds can vary a bit from bookmaker to bookmaker, so it’s not like there’s one definitive price for the ‘under’ or ‘over.’

This is all a bit much for the average person. But, if you’re someone who likes to study odds and stats before making a wager, it might be worth looking into. After all, if you’re going to be placing a few bets during the next month, it’s worth knowing what the odds are and how they impact your decisions. This will also help you become a savvy, data-driven sports bettor who knows exactly what they’re doing and can make informed, smart decisions based on facts rather than emotions.

The American Odds

Finally, we have the American odds. As the name implies, the American odds maker, DraftKings, offers much simpler wagering options than the British or Japanese options. First, you’re just betting on the outcome of the fight (‘under’ or ‘over’), so there’s no need to study stats or form. And, second, American odds are typically presented as a single number (e.g., ‘-210′) rather than a percentage (e.g., ‘2.1 to 1′), so it’s much easier to understand. And, finally, unlike the British odds, American odds are almost always the same from bookmaker to bookmaker, so it’s a guaranteed level of accuracy. This makes them much more convenient for betting and much less susceptible to manipulation by unscrupulous bookmakers.

Which Style Should You Focus On?

Now that you’re familiar with the different types of odds available, it’s time to figure out which one(s) you should pay attention to. If you’re in the United Kingdom and want to bet on the outcome of the fight (i.e., which fighter wins?), you’ll want to look into the British odds. If you’d like to bet on the style of the fight (i.e., will it be an exciting slugfest or a tactical fight?), you might want to check out the American odds. Or, if you’re in the Americas and want to bet on the outcome of the fight (i.e., which fighter wins?), you’ll want to check out the American odds, as there’s no British option available for betting in the Americas. Finally, if you’re in Asia and want to bet on the style of the fight (i.e., will it be an exciting slugfest or a tactical fight?), you’ll want to check out the Japanese odds, as the American and British odds aren’t available in the region.

As for what the ‘+’ and ‘-‘ mean in this case, if you wager ‘+’ symbols on a losing fight – that is, if the spread is set at three goals and the chosen fighter loses – the payout is generally around (but not always) 100 to 1. Why? Because the bookmaker makes a revenue-sharing deal with the UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship). Essentially, the UFC collects on a lot of these bets because most people bet with them. So if you had a $100 deposit and wagered $100 on a fight that ended in a ‘3,’ you’d end up with a $300 payout (assuming your selection wins). This is why you often see ‘+’ next to a selection. It simply means ‘Ticket to Ride,’ as the UFC collects on these types of bets as well. Finally, keep in mind that different sportsbooks have different rates and different minimums, so make sure you check out the rules and regulations of the book you’re planning to play at before placing any bets.