What Does o and t Mean in Betting Lines?

When you are new to sports betting, it is extremely helpful to understand the terms used by bookmakers. Many times, a clever term or two can make all the difference in taking down a few bucks or a big bankroll. Here, we will discuss the definition of some of the terms you will come across when reading sports betting articles online or in magazines. While many of these words have a standard meaning, they can also be used in a variety of ways among bookmakers or gamblers. Knowing what these words mean can help you figure out if an underdog is a good bet or if you should pass on a winning offer.

Odds Meaning

Odds are one of the most important betting terms you will come across because they mean the likelihood of one event occurring compared to another. Let’s say you wager on the Chicago Bears to score first in an NFL game this season. The point spread between the two teams is 10 points, so if you wanted to bet $100 that the Bears would score first, your odds of winning would be 10/1, meaning you would win $10 if the Bears score first and the Browns do not score before or during the game. If you bet $100 on the Browns to score first, your odds of winning would be 1/10 or 10/1.

In the example above, the odds of the Bears winning are 7/1, meaning there is a 1 in 7 chance the Browns will score first. This is called a long shot because it is extremely unlikely the Browns will score first in this particular game. In fact, the odds of the Browns winning are so low that the spread between the two teams is more than the point spread combined! If you did not understand what odds are and how they work, this may seem like a bit of a head scratcher. Fear not, understanding odds is incredibly easy once you have gone through this very basic tutorial and application. For more information on betting, check out this useful guide to betting basics written by the experts at mikefoster.com.

Taker/Maker

This is one of the more ambiguous terms in betting, but it essentially means the same thing. If you are looking to take a position on whether an event will occur or not, you are a maker. If you are looking to make a wager on an outcome and it will determine the winner of an event, you are a taker.

For example, if you think the Pittsburgh Steelers will cover the point spread in an NFL game this season, you would be a maker for betting that the Steelers will cover the point spread. If you think the Seahawks will cover the point spread in an NFL game this season, you would be a taker for betting that the Seahawks will cover the point spread.

Both maker and taker have the same goal of trying to maximize their winnings given a set of odds, but they go about it in different ways. A maker will look to pick the winner with the best odds, and a taker will look to pick the winner with the worst odds. Many books will list the best betting odds for each event, so you can easily find the best odds for making a wager on any given game or event. Knowing how these terms work will assist you in making the right decision when considering an underdog or a favorite for a wager.

Moneyline

This is the most basic form of wagering in sports betting. Simply put, the moneyline is the amount you are willing to wager on whether an event will occur or not. For example, you might wager $100 that the Chicago Bears will cover the point spread in an NFL game this season. This would be known as the moneyline for that particular game. You can also set the line to favor either the Underdog or the Favorite in an event, depending on your personal preferences. Some bookmakers will even give you odds on the moneyline, so you can bet on whether a game is going to get over or under the total amount of money wagered on that game.

It is extremely important to keep in mind that the moneyline is not a time frame in which the event will occur. For example, if you think the Detroit Lions will win the Super Bowl this season, you can bet on them using the moneyline in the Super Bowl, but they could also lose the game and you would still win your bet. The moneyline is simply a starting point for determining your wager; you can adjust it as you see fit depending on how much you are willing to wager. Many people like to use a minus sign before a number to indicate they are betting against the odds in a given situation. As an example, you could say you are betting $100 on the Buffalo Bills to cover the point spread in an NFL game this season, so your wager would be $-100 that the Bills will not cover the point spread. This might be a good place to stop and pick up some pointers, as these bets are commonly referred to as dog bites for men and goose bumps for women.

Sports Book

A sports book is where you can find all the lines for sporting events, as the name implies. If you are looking to place a bet on a specific game or event, you can usually find all the information you need, including sports books, in one place. If you are new to sports betting, it may be a good idea to try out a few different sports books to see which one offers the best odds in your favor for a particular event. Many sports books offer an amazing array of odds for all the major sports; finding the best one for you may not be easy, but it is certainly worth the effort!

This article discussed the meaning of some of the terms you may come across in sports betting, the odds, taker, and maker. Many times, a clever term or two can make all the difference in taking down a few bucks or a big bankroll. Knowing what these terms mean can help you figure out if an underdog is a good bet or if you should pass on a winning offer.