What Does TT Mean in Baseball Betting?

In baseball betting, “TT” is short for “Tampa Time.” Just as in golf betting, where a person’s “swing” refers to his or her entire round, in baseball betting, “Tampa Time” refers to the time it takes for the ball to leave the pitcher’s hand and travel to the batter.

What does TT mean? Here are some of the most common situations you might encounter when placing a baseball bet:

First Base Vs. Third Base vs. Home Plate

In most cases, whenever there is a play at first base, the batter will attempt to advance to second base. As soon as the ball is hit, the pitcher will come into the game to defend his position at second base. This is why the first baseman is commonly referred to as the “first footer.” When this situation occurs, you are most likely to see the “pitcher’s pick” bet offered at the betting window.

For an inside look at how these kinds of bets work, check out this short video from our friends at SportsBettingAdvice.com:

The video walks you through the steps of a pick-em game, which is how most major-league teams play.

Even Ground vs. Odds-On Betting

On a typical baseball bet, if the bettor is backing the home team, he will want to bet on the even-numbered innings (if the game is scheduled to be played before sundown). This way, the bettor has the best shot at covering his wager if his team wins.

If you are backing the visiting team in an even ground game, you will want to bet on the odd-numbered innings (1-9). The advantage to this is if your team wins, you’ll be rewarded with a payout slightly higher than what you risked. For example, if you bet $100 on the visiting team to win and they do, you’ll win $101 because of the commission.

Runner On First vs. No Runner

If the batter is on base when the ball is hit, or if the batter hits a base hit, then there is a run scored. Whenever there is a run scored during the game, you can bet on whether or not the batter will be able to reach first base before the winning team’s pitcher (most commonly the “bullpen” or “closer”).

For example, if you believe that the batter will reach first base on a single by the next batter, you can place a $5 or $10 bet on it at the betting window. If that single ball is hit after the pitcher has come out of the pen, you will win your bet; if it’s before, then you lose.

Long Ball vs. Short Ball

The length of a baseball bat determines whether or not the ball will be classified as a “long” or a “short” ball. The length of the bat, combined with the weight of the batter, determines the distance that the ball will travel. So, the longer and heavier the bat, the farther the ball will travel. Conversely, the shorter and lighter the bat, the closer the ball will travel. This is why you will see long balls referred to as “road homers” and short balls as “liners.”

While you don’t need to know the length of the bat to place a bet on this situation, you will need to know how far the ball will travel. If you are backing the home team and the ball is a long ball, you will be inclined to place a bet on the over (the long ball will exceed the distance from home plate to first base).

On the flip side, if you are backing the visiting team and the ball is a short ball, you will want to bet on the under. (In this case, the short ball will be less than the distance from home plate to first base.)

As a rule of thumb, you can assume that any ball that is hit out of the division (such as the American League) will be a long ball, and any ball that is hit in the opposite direction (such as the National League) will be a short ball.

Strikeout vs Innings Ordered

When a batter strikes out, it is because he was not able to reach first base on a ball that was hit. If the out is recorded in the third inning, and the batter has not had a chance to reach first base, you can bet on whether or not he will reach base before the winning pitcher. (Innings ordered is a way of recording a game in which a pitcher is relieved by an apprentice pitcher in the middle innings, who then continues the game.)

Innings ordered is most commonly seen in cases where the starting pitcher is knocked out of the game before the end of the fifth inning. If the starter leaves the game due to injury and is unavailable for the rest of the season, then you can see all of his outings as “in order.”

Runner On Third vs. No Runner

In the same way that if a batter reaches base after a hit, there is a run scored, so too if a runner reaches base on a third-party hit. When this happens, you can bet on whether or not the runner will be able to round third base and score before the winning team’s pitcher. (You will also need to know the distance between third base and home plate.)

For example, if you believe that the runner will reach third base on a single by the next batter, you can place a $5 or $10 bet on it at the betting window. If that single ball is hit after the pitcher has come out of the pen, you will win your bet; if it’s before, then you lose.

Double Score vs. Run Home

When a baseball game ends in a tie, or ends in a way that neither team is able to score a run, you can bet on whether or not a double (or more) score will be made by the end of the game. If you believe that there will be a double score, you will want to bet on the over, and vice versa.

For example, if you are backing the visiting team and the game ends in a tie, you will want to bet on the under (or at least close to it). If the game ends in a way that the home team scores once and the visiting team scores twice, you will most likely see a “pick-em” offer at the betting window for an inside peek at how these kinds of bets work.

No Hits vs. Hit By Pitch

Another way in which a baseball game can end is with no hits. Sometimes games will end with no hits due to one team being very good while the other team is very bad. (Or vice versa!) In the event of a no-hit game, you can bet on whether or not the pitcher will walk or strike out the batter (or both).

If you are backing the pitching team and no hits are recorded, you will want to bet on the pitcher to walk the batter. This is because you cannot win unless the batter hits the ball or the pitcher earns a walk. However, if the pitcher earns a strikeout, you will lose even if the batter does not hit the ball. So, in a nutshell, you cannot win without a hit or a walk. This makes for very interesting betting because, as a general rule, you will want to avoid betting on pitchers to strike out opponents when they have a history of walking batters. (Some exceptions to this rule do exist.)

Weather Affects Balls

Just as in golf, the weather can affect the flight of a ball. When it is hot out, the air is thick and there is little or no wind, resulting in the ball travelling farther. The opposite is true when it is cold out – even the best golfers experience trouble hitting the ball straight because the air is so thin and the ball tends to stay where it lands. Similarly, when it is windy out, the ball will sail away – the wind can blow the ball far, making it a “long” ball as mentioned above.

While we cannot control the wind in real life, we can control its effect on a ball. If you are wondering where you will find the best golfing weather, look no further than the Tropics – the hottest place on earth! The same goes for baseball – wherever the sun may shine, there will be no trouble scoring balls!